Category Archives: Goals

Hello Shanghai

Leaving our mark at one of the local pubs.
Leaving our mark at one of the local pubs.

Today is laundry day, so what better thing to do than write a few blog posts.

I arrived in Shanghai on Wednesday last week. The flight was a bit rough but ultimately uneventful. It was bittersweet to say goodbye to Xi’an, but other adventures were calling my name.

To save some cash and get a sense of the city I opted to take the No. 2 Metro line from the airport to a station close to my hostel. Fortunately signage was both in English and in Chinese which made purchasing a ticket (4 Yuan, or about 69 cents Canadian) and making my way to my destination rather simple. At least in theory. In practice I failed to consider my own stupidity and exhaustion. After falling asleep on the subway, I woke to find I’d missed my first stop and had returned almost all the way to the airport. Feeling like a twit, I quickly corrected the situation and was back on my way to my home away from home for the week.

Scotch on top of Shanghai
Scotch on top of Shanghai

After checking in, I decided to saunter around the neighbourhood. Within about 5 minutes I stumbled into Andy whom I’d met in Xi’an the week before. Having been here for a few days already he gave me the lay of the land, and then we went in search of food.

Since then, I’ve hung out with him and several other travellers – the Brits Laura, Chloe, Sam, and Hugh, the Aussie student-couple Andrew and Sassica, and the Americans Jack, Ben, and Lauren. Various subsets of us have opted to explore the local pubs and clubs together, and that of course has led to some rather late nights/early mornings. From the dark and dingy yet strangely inviting and friendly C-club, to the overpriced but entertaining Cheers, to the posh techno shoulder-to-shoulder deafening thump-thump and visual assault that was M18 and Myst, and to the not-so-crowded, not-so-loud techno thump-thump and free booze of SoHo, we’ve pretty much been all over the place.

Street BBQ is the new crack.
Street BBQ is the new crack.

Between bar-hopping, I’ve managed to make my way to the financial district – where fellow professor Chris and I celebrated with a scotch on the 87th floor overlooking the nightlife of Shanghai – to the Bund, and to the major shopping district of Nanjing Road. I’ve been amazed by the contrast between old colonial buildings and the new modern flash of skyscrapers. The street BBQs have turned into a staple after-bar snack. I’ve snapped my pic with an M&M dressed as a panda, I’ve enjoyed fresh coconut water and probably too many dumplings, and I have been entertained by the various Chinese to English translations that I’ve read. The people, as in Xi’an, are exceptionally hospitable and welcoming.

In short, this city is vibrant and amazing and has so much to offer, I think I might just be in love with it.

Good-Bye Xi’an

The moon over Xi'an
The moon over Xi’an

While I’ve technically be in Shanghai for 5 days already, I’ve been out having too much fun to sit down and write. I figured that I probably should write a little bit about my experiences today before I find myself looking at the city from my seat on a bullet train to Beijing.

Before I get into my adventures in Shanghai, I thought I’d offer up a huge thanks to Xi’an and the people who call that city home. Xi’an was amazing. So much so that I extended my stay a few days so that Peter and I could conquer a mountain. There was seriously so much to do in that city, and I can definitely see myself returning there in the future. Exploring the Bell and Drum towers, eating my face off in the Muslim District, cycling the walls of the old city, and visiting the Terra Cotta Warriors were all highlights of the trip. My adventure to the top of Huashan and subsequent plank walk were icing on the proverbial cake.

But it wasn’t all site-seeing and history. The city also connected me with some amazing people with equally amazing travel stories – some profound, others hilarious, all fascinating. There were nights spent sitting in the streets with locals and two students from France, drinking beer until the early hours of the morning, and other nights wandering the city with no particular goal in mind.

Adventuring with this nerd was clearly a blast.
Adventuring with this nerd was clearly a blast.

On one particular eve, Peter and I found ourselves looking at the almost-full moon through a massive telescope that someone had set up near the Drum Tower. We also found ourselves sitting and staring at the Drum Tower, amazed at its simplicity and beauty, amazed of where we were and how we got there, all while listening to a local musician play what we assumed was traditional Chinese music. It had all the makings for a cheesy romantic date-scene in some equally cheesy romantic movie – but all that was quickly shattered when we realized the musician had switched into Celine Dion’s My Heart Will Go On. Obviously laughter ensued.

I’m definitely going to miss Xi’an. And I’m definitely going to miss the band of misfits that I got to call friends for a short period of time. With any luck, I’ll meet up with some of them again on some random adventure in some random city in the future. If travel has taught me anything, it’s that the world is a rather small place, and stranger things have happened.

So long Xi’an, and thanks for everything.

Conquering Huashan Part III

All smiles before we walk the planks.
All smiles before we begin our descent to walk the planks.

The hike to the top of the east peak of Huashan was the first of three specific adventures that Peter, Gavin, and I had set out to do on Monday night. Watching the sun rise over the Yellow river valley after spending the night at the top of the mountain was the second. The final adventure was the descent of the mountain and a detour to brave the infamous plank walk.

For those who aren’t aware, Huashan is known for its treacherous and deadly paths. Despite chains and fences that have been put in place, alternate routes up the mountain, and the construction of a rather amazing set of lifts, people continue to die while attempting to summit. Where most of the deaths occur I have no idea, but my guess is that it has to do with the plank walk.

Situated more than 2km above sea level and at approximately 1 foot in width, the planks look like nothing more than dilapidated wood that may have once graced the side of a barn. Three separate pieces of wood make up the width of the planks, and these run the length of a shear cliff face.  The planks appear to be held together by glorified staples. Beneath them, mostly air until you hit the base of the valley far below. For the faint of heart it might be a paralyzing view.

For us, it was a must-do adventure

It's a long way down.
It’s a long way down.

Before beginning our climb down an almost 90 degree incline, we were strapped into harnesses. In theory the harnesses provided some measure of safety – but I’m more convinced that these were a money-making scheme above all else. While I have had some training with carabiners, I’m not so sure the 30 second demonstration provided most of the Chinese tourists attempting this now well-known path was sufficient. Nor was I convinced that the harness was actually set up to do what it needed to do should someone slip off the edge.

Of course that didn’t stop us.

Nor did the fact that the one-way path was, at least for that day, a two-way highway. As we descended, others climbed around, beside, and sometimes on top of us. It was chaotic, at times a bit frustrating, but more than all of that, it was amazing. Whenever I could I leaned out from the mountain wall to look down. The view was spectacular.

Eventually we found ourselves at the base of the rock-face – or at least the part where we would start traversing the cliff. This meant working with footholds that had at some point in time been carved into the mountain. Some were large enough to rest more than half a foot in, others not-so-much.

All along the path Peter and Gavin and I attempted photos of each other and ourselves. I leaned back several times as far as I could and held the camera above my head to capture the most perfect selfie possible.

Leaning back from a cliff wall is the only way to take a selfie.
Leaning back from a cliff wall is the only way to take a selfie.

At this point the two-way traffic became a bit bigger of a challenge. While it was perfectly comfortable to traverse the cliff via footholds in a single-file-moving-one-direction way, oncoming traffic added a new element of thrill to the entire venture. Without communicating a word we learned that returning traffic had to stay to the outside of the mountain. That is, they had to traverse the cliff-face by leaning out and around us.

Amazing! I won’t lie, I was pretty stoked to try this on my way back.

Before long we were at the planks. More oncoming traffic had us dancing with many other people – some more frightened than others – and all making their way around us back to the safety of where we started. The experience on the planks was exhilarating. More photos, lots of smiles, and lots of laughs were had as we gazed over our shoulders or turned around completely to face the valley below.

Shortly after the planks we found ourselves climbing up a final set of stairs. These were very narrow, not very deep, and filled with a stream of fellow plank-walkers who were returning to home base. This meant that the three of us were stuck in place as 10 to 12 people maneuvered around us. For those who were far too nervous to descend confidently, I took the time to guide their feet, tell them when and where to stop – allowing me ample time to unbuckle their carabiners one at a time, releasing the second once the first had been reconnected to the available safety lines – and then giving them instructions to continue on their way.

After what seemed like an eternity hanging out on the very narrow stairs, we were able to climb up and over to find an open area that was home to a small Buddhist temple. Again we laughed at what had just happened, thrilled that we’d had the opportunity to walk the planks.

It had to be done.
It had to be done.

Of course, we still had to return to home base. Which of course meant that we were on the outside path of the planks as we maneuvered around those who had begun the trek to the temple after us. I had thought that I was going to find this scary, but in all honesty it wasn’t. There was ample room to move, and while I wasn’t so confident in the harness I was wearing around my neck, I was cautious and safe, and I was confident in my ability to do what needed to be done.

After returning to home base we were all smiles, because holy shit, we’d just completed the plank walk. And once again I couldn’t help but shake my head smirking, thankful for the opportunity to do something so incredibly amazing with two great guys.

The rest of the morning was spent exploring the remaining peaks and finding our way down the mountain. I was tired and weary, desperately in need of a shower and food, but energized by the adventure that was Huashan.

Thanks again to Peter and Gavin for making Huashan such an amazing experience. This adventure wouldn’t have been the same without you.

Conquering Huashan Part I

Silhouetted crowds at the East Peak of Huashan - around 3:30 in the morning.
Silhouetted crowds at the East Peak of Huashan – around 3:30 in the morning.

Monday marked the day after my adventure with Peter biking around the city walls of Xi’an. Much of the day was spent figuring out the next legs of our respective adventures. At one point I was going to join him on his journey to Chengdu, but that opportunity seemed to flit away as soon as we realized that the buses, trains, and planes were all full – save for a few late night options.

We also were beginning to wonder how we were going to fit in Huashan – the epic mountain climb I had mentioned in previous posts – given the remaining options available to get Peter to Chengdu to see his friends.

We decided that Huashan would have to be a night climb. This way we’d be able to meet all of our schedules and take part in a very unique experience.

Figuring out how to get to Huashan was our first challenge. Trains were booked. Buses were booked. Renting a car would be too pricey. Everything was working against us. That is, until the opportunity for two standing only tickets were made available. We rushed to the train station with all of our hiking gear to purchase our tickets, only to find out that the train was indeed full. Fortunately for us, the ticket agent offered us two first class tickets on the high speed train. We gladly purchased these and were on our way – sometimes reaching speeds of almost 300kph.

As we raced towards the mountain, we chatted about the coming adventure. Specifically, we discussed the fact that we really didn’t know how to get from the North Huashan train station to the mountain, and the fact that our conversational Chinese was limited to saying hello, thank you, or asking for the bill, and the fact that we didn’t know how we were going to get back to Xi’an the next day. We probably should have been nervous, but what’s an adventure without a bunch of unknowns coupled with poor communication skills?

As we exited the train station, we were greeted by a very lively scene; people snapping whips (seriously), and a very large number of taxi drivers fighting to take us to the mountain for insanely inflated prices.

And then we met Gavin.

Gavin, from the US, had also decided to hike the mountain. Like us, he also wasn’t fully prepared for what was about to happen, but in a different way. While we had no idea how we were going to get to the mountain and home, or how to communicate with the locals, he had no idea what the hike involved or what equipment he might need.

Fortunately between the group of us we somehow formed a kick-ass team.

Gavin organized the taxi and got us to the mountain. Peter and I helped get Gavin up the mountain. It was a win-win situation.

Waiting for the sun to rise.
Waiting for the sun to rise.

After buying a twelve pack of beer (because why wouldn’t we want a twelve pack of beer for hiking a mountain?), and purchasing our entrance to the park, we started on our big adventure. The time was about 10pm and the way was lit only by the moon and the headlamps people were wearing.

The trek started simple enough – along what is known as the Soldier’s Road. The incline was gentle and the path was composed of a very well constructed set of stairs; stairs that went on. And on. And on. And on. And got steeper, and steeper. Oh, and steeper.

We weren’t alone on the trek. It seemed that thousands of locals were making the trek with us. Up and up we hiked. We stopped from time to time to catch our breath and give our legs a rest, and to enjoy a beer. We commented on the variety of people making the hike – some looked early on as if they weren’t going to make it, others looked strong and determined. Our collective goal – the east summit, where we’d be able to watch the sun rise around 5:30am.

In some sections the stairs were narrow – very narrow. In some sections the stairs were only big enough to put less than half your foot on. And in some sections the stairs were so steep (80% incline) they looked more like a wall with notches carved into it. And yet still we hiked, higher and higher up the mountain and into the night.

Eventually we found ourselves face to face with the steepest section. Imagine if you will a wall that leans out slightly towards you. Imagine three chains hanging down from above – setting up two lanes for potential climbers. Imagine stairs that are about 1 inch deep. And imagine people attempting to climb them, freaking out, and having to climb back down while others attempted to climb up. It was a bit chaotic. It was a bit insane. It. Was. Amazing.

Of course, it wasn’t necessary to take this route. There was a way to bypass it – and many people did. We talked about it, but I knew immediately that I was doing it. I hadn’t come all that way to wuss out. Peter and Gavin felt the same way. We were going to crush this.

All smiles as the sun starts to peak above the mountains.
All smiles as the sun starts to peak above the mountains.

As I approached the wall I simply took a breath, got my footing, grabbed the chains and started my ascent. I looked down, often, because why wouldn’t I? With each step closer to the top, I smiled more and more. With each step I took a moment and thought out my next move, then confidently made it. And it felt amazing. I fully expected some fear, but there was none. There was just an awesome sense of crushing the challenge.

And just like that we were past the wall and heading the rest of the way to the peak.

After about 4.5 hours we reached the eastern peak. The moonlight provided enough light to see that the valley below was expansive and incredible. The sky was huge and decorated with countless stars. It was an amazing moment and it was great to share it with both Peter and Gavin. We sat there, smiling, taking in everything, and celebrated with a couple beers.

We spent several hours chatting and napping on the mountain as we waited for the sun to rise. At some point I just sat there listening to the sounds of nature, and marvelling again at how lucky I am to be able to experience something like this.

I am the luckiest bastard I know.

Eating My Way Through The Muslim District

Dinner in the Muslim District with Peter
Dinner in the Muslim District with Peter. (Photo credit – Peter H.)

Since I arrived in Xi’an, I’ve made a point of visiting the Muslim District every day. There’s just too much going on there not to go. And every visit seems to offer something new – something that I either missed on previous visits, or something new and amazing that was added to the mix. It really is a feast for all of the senses.

The District is approximately 15 minutes from my hostel – assuming I’m moving at a very leisurely pace – and is situated right next to the Drum Tower. In the early morning hours it’s filled with vendors who are busy setting up for the day. Any time after 10am and it ranges from busy to crazy busy. The hustle and bustle is part of its charm. Of course, if you aren’t one for crowds this is probably not the place for you.

At night the area is truly hopping. Hundreds, if not thousands of people stream in and out of the area, sampling the many culinary treats they have to offer. It’s also particularly entertaining to watch each of the various dishes being prepared, in the open, on the street.

Saturday evening was the first time I actually decided to sit down on the street to eat. Previously I had bought food and continued to wander, enjoying dinner and a show – as it were. I sat with Peter as we ate noodles and watched the crowds go by. Everyone was smiling, laughing, snapping photos, and truly enjoying the marvel that is the District. Peter and I happily posed for many photos as we sat there and ate. We waved at little kids who stared at us wide-eyed, sending them into fits of giggles. The experience was truly fantastic and definitely one of the highlights of my trip so far.

The food in the area really is fantastic. So far I’ve sampled various mushrooms, tofu, noodles, pastries, sugary drinks, quail (I think) eggs, and more. This doesn’t even begin to cover the variety of food available, which of course means I have a lot of work to do if I really want to eat my way through the Muslim District.

Challenge happily accepted Muslim District. Challenge happily accepted.

Adventuring Adventurers

Biking the city wall with this guy.
Biking the city wall with this guy.

After my Big Wild Goose Pagoda excursion on Friday, I returned to the hostel to rest and meet up with fellow traveller Peter. I met Peter while we were both working in Dalian. After chatting via the interwebs, I learned that he would be heading to Xi’an, Chengdu, and finally to Hong Kong. After further chatting via the interwebs, he also foolishly agreed to climb Mount Huashan with me. Muah.

The climb, of course, is the thing that I must do on this trip. You know, on top of all the site-seeing and eating and eating and more eating. Also, did I mention the eating?

Since the big mountain adventure won’t happen until tomorrow, we’ve spent the last couple of days wandering the city together, chatting with other travellers, and getting up to no good. While I love exploring cities completely on my own, it’s also great to have someone here to share the experience with. And as is always the case, I’ve found that most of the people I’ve met on my travels have been rather amazing; they are adventurous, laid back, and full of fantastic stories. While Peter is a few years younger than me, he has travelled to places that are still on my list.

I’ve also been fortunate enough to meet some other amazing people on my trip so far. There’s Andrew – a 51 year-old rare-earth mineral explorer from Australia, who has some amazing stories of wandering the world (and is currently dealing with a bout of malaria). There are the two Dutch twenty-something guys who joined Peter and I last night as we watched the Brazil-Holland match; one of whom is finishing his Masters. We ended up having a great discussion about statistics and how he needs to analyze his data. Benjamin and Arthur are two undergrad students who have been living in China for the past 5 months on exchange. We joined them when we explored the Terra Cotta Warriors yesterday. Maggie is a visiting professor from Chengdu. Her and I spent several hours chatting the other day, and since then she has greeted me with a huge smile, and is often offering me food. There was also Haichao Liu, a local student who spent some time chatting with me to help improve his english skills. So many great stories. So many friendly faces.

While I love travel for its ability to open me up to the different corners of our world, I love how it also connects me with people I might otherwise never meet. True travellers, at least in my opinion, share not just a love of travel – they share a love of life. It’s quite infectious, and makes the experiences all the more incredible. Where some might travel China and complain about the dust or the heat or the crowds or the many things that aren’t the norm in North America, these people happily dive into the culture, learning as much as they can, and taking some part of the experience home with them. Honestly, I think if more people traveled with an open mind, we’d have far fewer issues in the world.

I’m going to miss these folks when I return home. Fortunately that won’t happen for another few weeks. In the meantime, Peter and I are going to organize the mountain climb, and figure out how we’re getting to Chengdu. Apparently there are pandas there. Clearly I have to go.

The Big Wild Goose Pagoda

The Big Wild Goose Pagoda
The Big Wild Goose Pagoda

When I woke Friday morning I knew it was going to be beautiful outside. For the previous two days we’ve had a light rain in Xi’an. It was very successful at clearing out some of the smog, reducing the humidity, and dropping the temperature about 5 or 10 degrees. But, that all ended last night – and in style I might add. After getting somewhat soaked walking around the city, the clouds parted, the sun started shining through, and the rain left a giant rainbow over the Bell Tower as a parting gift. Since then it’s been pretty much clear skies.

Given the great weather, I decided that I’d hit up the Big Wild Goose Pagoda – which is outside the walls of the old city of Xi’an. For reference, my hostel, the Bell Tower, the Drum Tower, the Muslim District, and several other notable spots are within the old walls. For extra fun, I figured I’d walk. The weather was just too good to ignore.

The walk took about an hour, give or take. I took my time, taking in as much of the scenery as possible. The city was quite vibrant – people setting up shop, selling fruits and breads, and various other knick-knacks. Breakfast happened as I walked – juice and some delicious peaches. Not a bad way to start the day.

After much walking, I arrived at the Big Wild Goose Pagoda. It was nothing like I expected it to be. I had assumed it was only a simple building; turns out it’s also a giant park. There were probably thousands of people wandering about, spending time with their families, enjoying the sun and the water park. There was so much to see, it’s a bit difficult to capture it all in words. Simply put, the park was vibrant. I wandered around for several hours enjoying the weather, people watching, and marvelling at the Pagoda.

All told, not a bad day. Not a bad day at all.

The Adventure Continues

Making friends in Xi'an
Making friends in Xi’an

I meant to write about this the other day but then adventure happened and I forgot. If you’ve been keeping up with things I decided to explore both the Bell Tower and the Drum Tower a few days back. I’d give you an exact date, but to be honest, living in the future has a way of making one not care about the time. I’m pretty confident, at least, that today is Friday (thank you very much iPhone).

Anyway, a few days ago I was exploring the upper floor of the Drum Tower. Specifically, I had just ventured outside to the exposed walkway that runs the perimeter of the building. It provides a beautiful view of the city, as well as some pretty spectacular examples of Chinese architecture and art. I was, for most of my visit, on my own. I think I had arrived early enough to beat the rush. At some point, however, I rounded one of the corners and almost ran into a young woman and her boyfriend. She looked at me and started speaking to him rather excitedly, then started looking at me and pointing at her phone. I assumed she wanted me to take a picture of the two of them. I smiled, reached out to take the phone, but at the same time she passed the phone to her boyfriend. Next thing I knew she was cozied up next to me and he was snapping several photos. I smiled like an idiot, unaware of what was going on. The photo shoot ended, they thanked me profusely, then went on their way.

And I stood there smirking, chuckling to myself, and wondering if the universe were playing some sort of cosmic joke on me. Did they think I looked like someone else? Was this a dare – collect as many photos with unsuspecting Canadians as possible? I laughed it off and continued on my exploration of the city.

Then yesterday it happened again. I was sitting under an umbrella at a local Starbucks – because of course they have Starbucks here – watching the world go by. Sometimes exploring is best when you do it from the comfort of a chair with a hot beverage. As I sat there watching the throngs of people come and go, I saw a group of women to my left chatting and looking in my direction. At some point, one of them walked in my direction. She cautiously walked past me as if to suggest she was looking for someone, but since her stealth skills were lacking it was very obvious she was moving to stand directly behind me. At the same time, one of her friends was trying to capture the photo without looking like she was trying to capture the photo. The rest of her troupe stood in the distance staring but not staring. It was all too comical.

I turned and looked at the woman standing behind me. She smiled and giggled like a little girl, I smiled back, and told her it was okay to take the photo. At that point, recognizing that I was finding this all very fun and amusing, another woman joined the stream of pictures that would follow. I sat there, smiling like an idiot, laughing about the situation, while they posed themselves around me. Apparently it was also necessary for them to hold my arm, my shoulder, or my chest while the photos were happening. I assume it was strictly for them to maintain their balance. HA!

Rainbow over the Bell Tower
Rainbow over the Bell Tower

Unlike the photo event in the Drum Tower, I decided to have them take a picture for me as well. I mean, why the hell not, right? I laughed, they laughed, and they happily obliged. Later, after I left the Starbucks and headed closer to the Bell Tower (to capture an epic sky and rainbow that followed a very light rain), I ran into the women again. They once again had me pose with them, this time with the Drum Tower as a backdrop.

Amused, I returned to my hostel to post some pics and relax for the rest of the eve. I spent part of the night also laughing about the events of the past day.

And then, believe it or not, it happened again. My life has reached new levels of weird.

As I sat enjoying an espresso, a young man and his troupe of twenty-somethings approached my table. He was pointing at his phone and repeatedly saying the words “picture” and “friends”. Now despite what had happened earlier, I assumed he really wanted me to help him get a photo of him and his friends. I mean, having a group of middle-aged women ask for my photo is one thing (because that happens all the time), but a group of twenty somethings? That’s just extra weird. Of course, based on the theme of this post, you’ll know that I was wrong. I stood up, tried to take his camera, and realized at that point that it was the troupe of women all over again.

Matilda and me. I'm not really sure what her name was, but I think Matilda fits.
Matilda and me. I’m not really sure what her name was, but I think Matilda fits.

As the one young man – we’ll call him Billy, because why the hell not – put his arm around my waist and insisted that I put my arm around his shoulders, I stood there awkwardly, laughing, assuming the universe was indeed playing some sort of cosmic joke on me. While waiting for Billy to find the perfect pose for the two of us, the cameraman – we’ll call him Eddy – looked at me and stated in very broken english “you are very beautiful man”. They all seemed far too excited. Seriously – this has got to be a joke – I thought. But they snapped away. Billy was replaced by Matilda, who rested her head on my shoulders and closed her eyes as if to be napping. More photos were taken – peace signs were held up, arms were interlocked, hands were placed on my chest as if her and I were a couple. So. Freaking. Weird. As before, I insisted they take photos with my camera as well. Thank you’s were exchanged, and then they left.

And once again I sat there wondering what the hell happened.

Oh China, you are one crazy place, but I think I love you.

Today Was All Over The Cultural Spectrum

Today was epic.

If you’re following my Instagram feed, you’ll already know that I did a lot of exploring of Xi’an today.

What started out as a trek to the Bell Tower, turned into an adventure that included the Bell Tower, the Drum Tower, the Muslim District, the North and South Gates of the city, several temples on top of the wall that borders the city, and a shopping mall (because it was hot and I needed to cool off a bit).

The two towers were both beautiful. Every inch of them were decorated in such detail that I found myself looking in every corner for whatever they had to offer. Dragons, lions, cranes, calligraphy, and ancient artwork were everywhere. The pictures I snapped really don’t do it justice.

The Muslim District was a huge treat. I walked up and down the area taking in all of the varieties of food that they have to offer. I’ll definitely be heading back there tomorrow to sample some of their wares, and to check out a mosque that I stumbled on. And I’ll likely take some more photos, hopefully of some of the artisans doing what they do best.

After leaving the Muslim District and taking in all that I could at the towers, I moved north to the North Gate. I didn’t pay to enter them as I’d heard that the South Gate was better. But, I did wander about and pick up some food (grapes, a donut like pastry, and some melon). Late breakfast of champions!

The South Gate was truly amazing and worth the 54¥ to enter (about $9 Canadian). It provided a great vantage point that gave me a better sense of the size of the city. FYI – it’s huge (population roughly 8.5 million people in 2010).

After exploring the South Gate and the wall (not the wall), I decided to venture back to my hostel. But, given the heat I made a short stop in one of the many shopping malls along the way to cool off. There I found some stores with the greatest names I’ve ever seen. And by greatest, I mean greatest at least from a North American 12 year-old boy’s very immature point of view.

For example, the mall was home to a woman’s clothing store called Titty & Co. If that weren’t giggle-worthy enough: directly across the hall from that – another clothing store called Teenie Weenie. It may have been a kid’s clothing store, but I was giggling too much to notice. Because I’m just that mature.

Perhaps I’ve had too much sun.

Vacation To-Do Lists Are The Best To-Do Lists

Time to wander.
Time to wander.

It’s currently 5:12am on July 8th, 2014 as I write this. Yes – you are correct – I am still in the future. Well, at least for those of you in North America who follow this blog. I’m not sure how the quantum space-time bric-a-brac thingamajig works exactly – for all I know there are people somewhere on earth who are even deeper into the future than I am – but I don’t know who you futuristic people are, so I’m just going to pretend that I am the future for now.

Okay, my curious nature got the better of me. According to www.timeanddate.com there are people on earth who are farther into the future than I am. I think the farthest into the future are people living in a place called Kiribati in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, almost directly south of Hawaii (at least based on the map I’m viewing). The tiny island nation appears to live 6 hours farther into the future than China (right now it’s 11:12am, July 8). What’s weird is that the folks in Kiribati live a full 24 hours into the future compared to the folks in Hawaii, and they’re only separated by 2152km of ocean. Quantum mechanics are clearly confusing, especially at 5am in the morning. Regardless, I assume the Kiribatians get around with flying cars, and that they communicate in ways that are beyond our ability to understand.

I digress.

Today I’m going to continue my adventures in Xi’an. Specifically I’m going to venture to the world-famous Bell Tower. According to the all-knowing Wikipedia, the Bell Tower is approximately 630 years old; built during the Ming Dynasty. It stands approximately 40 meters tall, and houses a bell that weighs 6500kg. I’ve also read that it’s particularly beautiful at night when it is lit up with various colours of light.

Other than that, I’m going to wander the city some more.

Yup, my list of things to do today include 1. Go see the Bell Tower, and 2. Wander the City. I love vacation to-do lists.

So Long Dalian

Visiting the sea and wandering the square on my last day in Dalian.
Visiting the sea and wandering the square on my last day in Dalian.

I’ve just finished packing up all of my stuff, save for my computer. I’ve double and triple checked the hotel to make sure I’ve left nothing behind, and from what I can tell, I’ve got everything. Next stop, Xi’an.

Xi’an is in the province of Shaanxi, about a 2 hour and 20 minute flight from where I currently am. It’s also home to the Terracotta Warriors, a giant eleventy-billion kilogram bell, and various other must-see things for the newbie travelling in China. It is also only a hop, skip, and a jump from Huashan – the 2000+ metre mountain that I’m aiming to climb. You may remember that it’s also home to the world’s “most dangerous hike”, and that a teahouse of sorts awaits me at the top. I’ve also learned that it has numerous temples on the hike up, so I’m likely going to be taking about a zillion more photos.

My week in Dalian has been amazing. Yesterday it was capped off with a trip to the new Dalian Nationalities University campus (which is huge), Golden Pebble Beach, lunch at a local Japanese restaurant, and then an adventure into downtown Dalian, plus a jaunt to the sea and the largest square in the city (Xinghai Square) and Asia for that matter. This all came at the end of a great week meeting faculty and students at the university, giving a talk on community engaged scholarship and computer science, and filling my face with authentic Chinese food.

I’m not saying that Xi’an has a lot to live up to, but I’m also not not saying that.

Somehow I have a feeling that it’ll deliver.

China – More Than Meets The Eye

I love jet lag. No really. There’s nothing like waking up at 3am because one’s body feels rested only to start passing out at 6pm.

Can you taste the sarcasm?

Clearly I hate jet lag and all of it’s stupid jet laggy ways. Of course, if this is the price I must pay for wanderlusting adventure-times, I’m at least okay with it.

Despite the messed up sleep schedule, I’m having a blast. The food has been nothing short of awesome, and the hospitality is off the charts. Seriously, the folks here at Dalian Nationalities University are spoiling me rotten.

Today we were supposed to go to Golden Pebble Beach, but once again the air was thick with smog. Instead they opted to take me to see the new Transformers movie. While it won’t be winning any awards any time soon (unless they are awards for big explosions and retinal damaging visual effects), it was a really nice gesture.

Another added bonus for today – I had the pleasure of presenting to the computer science faculty and students. I gave the Dean of the Computer Science and Engineering College an option of several lectures: image processing with wavelets, data visualization, and community engaged scholarship. He opted for community engaged scholarship.

Let me say that again. Community engaged scholarship!

For those of you in the know, that translates to Farm To Fork. That’s right folks, Farm To Fork has made it’s official entry to China. Crazy, no? Even after finding out that I’d be lecturing here, I never thought Farm To Fork would be a topic. I’m pretty stoked.

Anyway, I’m not sure what’s on tap for tomorrow, but I’m sure it’ll be fun. China has been an amazing experience thus far. And best part – the adventure has only just begun.

Can’t. Stop. Smiling.

Adventuring The Future

Crazy smog
Crazy smog

It’s day something-or-other of my adventure to China. I’ve settled in to my first week without any major hiccups, save for the jet lag. This is by far the worst jet lag I’ve ever experienced. But, I guess that happens when one adventures into the future.

Today I ventured to the peak of Daheishan mountain – which translates to black mountain. While it wasn’t a long hike, it was filled with a lot of history and some pretty epic temples. I was awestruck at the intricate artwork and detail that went into even the simple things. I tried to capture as much as I could but I’m not sure I did it justice. If you’re interested, check out my pics on my Instagram feed. I’d add a direct link, but jet lag is whispering a sleepy-time tune in my ear and I’ll likely be out in minutes. Direct link here.

The one thing I didn’t get to see today was a view from the top of the mountain. A strong cloud of smog blew in early this morning and pretty much destroyed all hope of scenic vistas. I’ve never seen smog this thick, and I have to wonder how many packs of cigarettes I’d have to smoke to do the same damage as the smog I inhaled all day. Despite the potential health risks, the smog gave everything an eerie haunted feel. Figures in the distance looked ominous and dangerous. The landscape seemed to have been devoured by the Nothingness. Shadows looked increasingly menacing. So all told, the smog was pretty cool actually (you know, if one ignores the environmental disaster that is a smog day).

The only other thing I’ve done while here is eat. My hosts seem to think that I need to be fattened up. I fully expect to return with a giant belly full of gastronomic adventures, and probably 20 extra pounds.

Tomorrow – well, today for me, tomorrow for you – I’ll be heading to Golden Pebble beach, and then giving a lecture. After that? Who knows.

For now – I must sleep.

Happy Canada Day From China

When last I wrote, I was sitting at gate C32 awaiting my boarding call. Flash forward 16 hours in the air, and a 3 hour layover, and I am now comfortably lounging in my hotel room. It’s currently 1:55 in the morning on Tuesday July 1st. That’s right, I’m speaking to you from the future.

What’s the future like, you ponder? Is it filled with flying cars and almost-sentient robots who will one day rise up and enslave humanity? Nope. Not quite. In fact, it’s pretty much exactly the same as my yesterday, which is your now. That is, my now (your future), differs from my past (your present), in the fact that my now (your future), is Canada Day. So Happy Canada Day from the future.

Anyway, I’d like to tell you more about the future but to be honest I’m rather knackered. And I’m sure that my telling you about the future would somehow violate the space-time continuum prime directive. And also, I’m going to bed.

The Adventure Begins With A Ripple In The Space-Time Continuum

Tickets!
Tickets!

I’m currently sitting at gate C32 at Pearson, patiently awaiting my time to board. Apparently I have another 20 minutes to wait.

I’m filled with a lot of nervous excitement. I’m sure that will pass once I board and realize I have 14 hours of air time to go before I reach the first of two destinations. In this case – Beijing followed by Dalian.

While the flight is roughly 14 hours, I’ll be landing 26 hours after I take off. It’s all due to some sort of weird ripple in the space-time continuum. That, or perhaps the international date line combined with the fact that I’m chasing the sun for 14 hours. Regardless, when I land it will be roughly 7:20pm tomorrow.

I think.

I believe I’ll have a few hours to mill about in the Beijing airport before I board my flight to Dalian. At that point, I’m assuming there will be someone there to pick me up. Who knows. That’s what makes it an adventure.

Whatever happens, I’m at the airport heading somewhere I’ve never been. Naturally, I couldn’t be happier.

See you in the future.