Four Fifths The Man I Used To Be Means My Awesome Is 25% More Concentrated

I started using RunKeeper in December of 2008. Since that time I have used it to track my runs, walks, hikes, bikes, and such.  Being a big spreadsheet nerd, I also started tracking my yoga1 in January of 2010.  Of course, I’m not always religious with tracking, in the sense that I don’t use RunKeeper to monitor all activities. And in some cases, such as when I’m on vacation, I have to ballpark my distances as best I can. I try to be reasonable about these types of activities so as not to make myself look better than I am. That is to say, I purposely underestimate a lot of my exercise when I can’t actually track it.

Having that in mind, I was blown away when I actually took a peak at my numbers today. Being a numbers person it’s amazing I haven’t really paid too much attention to this previously. Not only was I amazed at the Calories burned over time, but also with the change in activity level in just a few short years.

According to RunKeeper, as of February 1, 2011, I have

  • burned at least 102, 439 Calories,
  • performed 315 activities, and
  • covered at least 2, 916 km.
Summary of my RunKeeper data since 2008

What exactly would 102, 439 Calories look like?  I wondered that too.  So I googled it.  The verdict: 102, 439 Calories is equivalent to consuming approximately

  • 640 tall vanilla soy lattes from Starbucks2 (mmm, soy latte),
  • 190 Big Macs3,
  • 11.382 kg of fat (equivalent to about 25 pounds), or
  • 27.317 kg of white sugar.

Of the 315 activities, 19 have occurred so far in 2011, 269 were recorded in 2010, 22 were recorded in 2009, and 5 were recorded in 2008.  Of course, 2008 wasn’t a full year, and I don’t recall how much I actually recorded any exercise I might have done during 2009.  However, I have no memory of being overly active then given that I was in the depths of my Ph.D., so these numbers might be representative.

Ultimately it has paid off.  At the end of 2008, I was weighed by my doctor during a routine physical.  Apparently, during the course of my Ph.D. I had ballooned to 185 lbs.  Yikes!

This is me circa 2008, at the Annual Math & Stats Christmas Party. Pork-meister extreme.

It was shortly after this time that I developed a sliding hiatal hernia (the same type of hernia that recently sent Charlie Sheen to hospital), which affected my appetite (in the sense that eating hurt, and I was throwing up a lot).  Clearly this had an effect on my weight.  That is to say, it dropped pretty quickly, as evidenced by the following picture.  Give that man a sandwich.  Ew.

This is me in September of 2010. I clearly need a sandwich.

To compensate for this unhealthy weight loss, I decided to start exercising more.  The rationale was that any further weight loss could be attributed to ‘healthy living’.  It made sense at the time.   The hernia still remains; to be fixed via surgery sometime in June/July.  Anyway, throughout the past year and a bit, I’ve had to learn how to eat enough, so as to maintain the level of exercise I want to perform, but also to prevent myself from further losing weight, and in such a manner as to prevent an episode of intense pain brought on by acid reflux; a major side effect of the hernia.  It hasn’t been easy.  This is not the norm for me; I typically can gain weight just by looking at a delicious slice of cake-y goodness.  Or thinking about one.  True story.  In October of 2010, I was down to 137 lbs (attributed to the hernia, a 30 day challenge at the yoga studio, a lot of biking, about 5 km of daily walking, and training for a half marathon).  Crazy stuff.  Since then, I’ve actually managed to gain some weight.  I’m up to 145’ish, which is a weight that I’m happy to be.  Now I just have to maintain it 🙂

Anyway, getting back to the data,  in 2010 I:

  • walked approximately 1, 491 km,
  • biked approximately 1, 557 km, and
  • ran approximately 347 km.

“But how can that be, since 1, 491 + 1, 557 + 347 > 2, 916?” you ask. “Good eye” I reply. But to really answer your question, we need to note that for several months in 2010, I didn’t actually use RunKeeper to record my daily walk to and from the school. And I’m too lazy to back input the information. The missing walks would have totalled approximately 540 km of the 1, 491 listed above.

Prior to running the 2010 Goodlife Toronto Half Marathon
Post running the 2010 Goodlife Toronto Half Marathon (1 hour, 50 minutes)

My most active months were June through October, where I covered on average 13.52, 17.78, 15.23, 11.60, and 13.15 km per day.  During these months I also spent anywhere from 40 to 60 minutes daily on average practicing yoga. Crazy stuff.

Speaking of yoga, in 2010 I managed to log 14, 840 total minutes practicing.  That’s 247.33 hours, or 10.31 solid days of bendy goodness.  Clearly I love bendy goodness.  Even if sometimes it means I smash my face into the ground.

Posing with a pineapple on the black cliffs below our house. Because it seemed like the thing to do.

Of course, being a numbers nerd, I can’t help myself but to set up new goals for this year.  And yes, I know it’s already February so I’m a little late to the setting of goals for 2011, but I’m not one to follow rules unless they are mathematical in nature.

So here is my plan/goal for 2011:

  • Walk 1, 800 km,
  • Bike 2, 000 km,
  • Run 500 km, and
  • Spend 20, 000 minutes practicing yoga.

So far this year, I have:

  • Walked 176 km,
  • Biked 0 km,
  • Ran 15 km, and
  • Spent 955 minutes practicing yoga.

Clearly I need to step it up a notch if I want to reach my goals.  I’ll have to try to remember this next February 1, to see how many Calories I have managed to burn between now and then.  Wish me luck.


1 I practice yoga both at home (typically 30-60 minutes now per day in the morning), and at Moksha Yoga Guelph; check it out if you want to do something AWESOME for yourself. You won’t regret it.

2 Based on a 160 Calorie tall vanilla soy latte made in Canada (the US version has 180 Calories for some reason). Full nutritional information here.

3 Based on a 540 Calorie Big Mac made in Canada. Full nutritional information here.

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8 Comments Add yours

  1. Bum says:

    Wow.

    I feel fully updated now. Thanks for my sake for the thorough recap.

    Now I understand why you lost the weight, why your face was bleeding and why you were doing so much yoga.
    Props on that. I have never tried yoga. Leah loves it.

    Also being a numbers person, I just ignored all the numbers you were posting there. When you do numbers for a living like us sometimes it’s nice to just focus on the story and forget the numbers. I mean it is a snow day today. : ) Just kidding of course. I think it’s tres cool that you are documenting your life in number-form. And then blogging about that.

    Most of all I am glad you found a balance with your health. In that skinny pic you look pretty good from nipple up, but from nipple down whoa man. And then there is that perfect nipple of yours. Ohhhh. Ha haha hahahahaha.

    Anyhoo I’m going to scan the rest of your blog but thanks again for this.

    P.S. the scar looks badass.

    Bum

  2. Carolyn says:

    Your actual half-marathon time is my fantasy half-marathon time.

    I also have a hiatal hernia (though yours sounds worse). What are the odds?

    (Rhetorical question…no need to actually calculate the odds.)

    1. dangillis says:

      As we all know, the odds are P(herniated)/[1-P(herniated)]. Since we do not know the true value for P(herniated), we estimate it using the sample proportion p(herniated). Given our convenience sample of n=2 (which clearly introduces bias, as the sample is not random and likely correlated due to the confounding effects of being awesome), p(herniated) is estimated to be 2/2=1. As such, the odds are estimated to be 1/0, which is clearly undefined. This is most likely related to the fact that we are made of pure awesome.

      1. Carolyn says:

        LMAO…wow…the nerdery.

      2. dangillis says:

        Did you really expect anything less?

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